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Will Washing Up After Sex Help Me Avoid Getting An Infection?


So you had sex. Congratulations! Sex is a great way to connect with your partner and explore your own body. But it's also important to take care of yourself after sex.

 

One of the most important things you can do after sex is to wash up. This will help you avoid infection and keep your body healthy. But there are a lot of myths out there about how to best wash after sex.

 

In this post, we'll debunk the myths and teach you the best way to wash after sex so you can avoid infection and feel clean and refreshed.

Why You Should Wash After Sex

Sex can be messy. Not just emotionally, but physically as well. And one of the most important things to keep in mind after getting busy is hygiene.

 

Washing up after sex is one of the simplest and most effective ways to avoid infection and keep yourself healthy. By using warm water and soap, you can remove any bacteria or semen that may have accumulated on your skin.

 

If you're not near a sink, you can also just wash with warm water to help cleanse the area. Just be sure to avoid using harsh chemicals or cleaning products, as they can actually cause more damage than good.

What Water Temperature Is Best for Preventing Infection

There's some debate over what the best water temperature is for washing after sex, but most experts seem to agree that it's best to use lukewarm water. Lukewarm water will help to kill any bacteria or viruses on your skin, while hot water can actually cause skin irritation and increase the risk of infection.

What Kind of Soap Is Best for Washing After Sex

You're probably used to using soap when you wash your hands, but what kind of soap should you use when you wash after sex?

 

When it comes to washing after sex, it's important to use a soap that will kill bacteria and viruses. You should avoid using scented soaps, as they can cause irritation, and stay away from harsh detergents that can damage the delicate skin around the vagina.

 

The best type of soap to use is an all natural unscented soap created for sensitive parts.

Which Body Parts You Should Focus on Cleaning

Now that you know the basics of double cleansing, it's time to focus on the important stuff: your body! When it comes to washing after sex, there are a few key areas you need to focus on.

 

The first is your genitals. Be sure to use a mild soap and warm water to cleanse all of the nooks and crannies, and be extra careful when cleaning around the clitoris and vaginal opening. Gently wipe from front to back to avoid spreading any bacteria.

 

The second area to focus on is your anus. Many people forget about this area, but it's just as important to keep clean. Use a gentle soap and lukewarm water, and be sure to rinse thoroughly.

 

Last but not least, don't forget about your hands! Make sure to use soap and warm water, and scrub well under your nails.

What to Do if You Can't Shower Right Away

If you can't shower right away, there are a few things you can do to clean up until you can. First, use a damp cloth to wipe any visible fluid or debris from your skin. Then, use an unscented baby wipe or wet tissue to clean your genital area. Finally, if you have time, you can wash your entire body with soap and water. Be sure to pay close attention to your genital area and under your breasts, as these are the areas where bacteria can grow and cause infection.

While there isn't one right answer to the question of how to best wash after sex, there are definitely some things that you should and shouldn't do in order to avoid infection.

 

Washing your body with soap and water is a good place to start, but be sure to pay special attention to your genital area. You may also want to consider using V-Blissful Soothing Solution to balance the pH level in your vagina (sex causes an imbalance) and avoid using fragrant soaps, detergents, or other harsh chemicals.

 

Above all, be sure to consult with your doctor if you're experiencing any unusual symptoms after sex.